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Daisy Helman

Bouquet of the Week: Freedom Flowers

As part of our recurring Bouquet of the Week series, Garden Collage continues to present a weekly inspirational bouquet that incorporates intriguing new elements into the traditional practice of flower arranging. This week, Garden Collage styles some iconic flowers together in the same bouquet: wild rose, black-eyed susans, and the ever-popular sunflower.

This week I decided to decorate my Fourth of July Table with flowers from our garden. Each year my family and I spend the holiday on Martha’s Vineyard with our close family and friends, and it seems only fitting to be as local as possible with respect to the flowers we choose– Martha’s Vineyard, after all, is a beautiful little island that has a lot to offer the flower-lovers among us. This means popping into the garden and picking what is available. We decided to be a little messy with this week’s bouquet: it’s not perfect, but it goes with our style– we love to mix-and-match flowers and to use whatever plants are available, hence why we mixed in stray wild rose and a few violets that arrived in the garden on their own. Black-eyed susans and sunflowers are the foundation around which we integrated the violets and rose. (We cheated a bit and started our sunflowers very early this year, cultivating them in our greenhouse so that we could have them all summer long– they are a family favorite.)

The delicate and amazing white sweet pea comes back strong and more vigorously every year– even this year after the frigid winter and hopelessly delayed summer. As a result of its resilience, we made room for it in the bouquet. The wild daises, meanwhile, were crazy-prolific and they last forever, so they also became a good filler.

I had only a few edible Calendula flowers in my garden, but I thought the orange was a fun addition to the color palette I had going so I tucked in a few– it pays to be spontaneously and not take any design project too seriously. I like the idea of putting together a bouquet to celebrate freedom: this bouquet is not perfect, and it’s a mix of everything in the garden– the cultivated, the native, and the flowers that arrived without anyone noticing.

Garden Collage Bouquet of The Week

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